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SUGARS IN ENERGY DRINKS

July 4, 2018
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Energy drinks can be sweetened with sugars, such as sucrose (also called “table sugar”). Sucrose is made up of both fructose and glucose. Glucose can be absorbed directly into the bloodstream during digestion and is used as an energy source in cells. Most organisms from bacteria to humans use glucose as their main source of energy.

Some energy drinks are sweetened with sugar (providing caloric energy), but there is also a variety of sugar free options available. Sugar-free energy drinks are commonly sweetened with non-nutritive intense sweeteners like aspartame.

Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener. Aspartame is produced synthetically and the most commonly used sugar substitute worldwide. It can be found in over 5,000 different products such as soft drinks, yogurts, candy, chewing gum, etc. Aspartame is among the most thoroughly tested intense sweeteners and has an excellent safety profile.

The safety of aspartame and other sweeteners has been evaluated by regulatory institutions all over the world. Authorities rely on the safety evaluations of independent scientific advisory bodies such as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA), and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA).

Sugar-free energy drinks can contain one sweetener, or a combination of different sweeteners (e.g. aspartame, acesulfame K, sucralose). These sweeteners are among the most-tested and most-used sugar substitutes worldwide, and they all have an excellent safety profile. Numerous scientific studies demonstrate that these substances are safe for use as sweetening ingredients.

The safety of these sweeteners has been evaluated by regulatory institutions all over the world (e.g. the Food and Drug Administration in the US). Authorities rely on the safety evaluations of independent scientific advisory bodies such as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA), and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA)

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